Crossing into a new year armed with a pen

Ink sketch of people at the bar

New Year’s Eve: the borderlands of the year; symbol of hope, renewal, revelry. To some, the biggest party of the year. To others, just a day like all the others. I reckon my take on it falls somewhere in between. It’s nice to mark it, to be in the company of others, but not the sort of event I buy new clothes for, (Although, to be honest, I rarely buy new clothes for anything in particular.)

Left: sketch of a woman on tv interviewing revelers at Times Square. Right: two men dancing at the bar

So it was I found myself at my local around 10pm. I braved the dismal rain for two whole blocks to meet up with TL after her shift at the restaurant. She went home before the changing of the guard, but I stayed.

I’d spent the day working on updating my art website, and along the way I realized I’ve not done any drawings in two years with my trusted old ball-point with the ink that smears so wonderfully—so I armed myself thusly before heading out, hoping to fill the last few pages of my sketchbook at the close of the year.

Ink sketch of people at the far end of the bar

The simplicity of working with a single pen is good for bar drawings. You must work fast, as people may walk away or re-orient at any moment, The setting is dim, so details are hard to pin down anyway. These are aspects of bar drawing that I really enjoy. No time for thinking— just keep grabbing what information you can.

The type of decision-making apparent in these sketches differs from my more thoughtfully-approached drawings. I learn so much from doing them, despite that they never look finished or beautiful.

And now, it’s time to begin a new Moleskine, the first of 2019. Happy New Year, and thanks for reading!

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Paper-dry leaves crunch beneath our feet, and the wind is picking up

pencil sketch of a house in a bell jr

Tuesday I went to my first class in over 7 years— returning to the art of copperplate etching (intaglio). I’ve a small plate ready to work on before my next class on Tuesday. This is the wee sketch I did for it today.

It needs finessing, and then I’ll transfer it in reverse to my plate. I may change those trees to pines, and add some snow. We’ll see. I want to keep it fairly simple, but use this to re-familiarize with the studio and processes after such a long hiatus. Gotta wake up the muscle memory.

After I’ve got into a bit of a groove, I’ll embark on something more complex. I really want to design images with the various techniques in my mind from the start. Work to the medium’s strengths, not just mimic ink drawings or some such. More to come here as I progress!

Within an hour of waking, the sun has gladdened the windowpanes

ink sketch of a fence and field, trees in the distance

I stayed home last night; missed several parties, missed toasting with friends who I’ve not seen enough of. A head cold has been slinking ‘round the door for a few days (probably a few weeks), and by Midnight it’d overtaken me. I didn’t have any the past two winters, but I’ve been burning candles at both ends lately, so I can’t be too surprised or upset.

Despite feeling poorly, it’s not a bad thing to cross the threshold of a new year quietly and in solitude. I did this little drawing to mark the changing of the guard. (I added the snow on a whim, though clearly those aren’t winter trees, all clad in leaves.)

I’d hoped for a cold-bright wander on New Year’s Day, but that’ll have to wait for better health. Glad tidings, with a few sniffles! I’ll see what I can make of it. More drawing, whether for me or my freelance project, will make a fine start of things for 2018.

A crow lighted in the yard for a moment

Day seventeen : A crow lit in the yard for a moment, tentatively. It tested the wind, then flew off to an unknown destination; a hooded gleam in its eye.

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See all of my #Inktober drawings @edaggarart

He chopped the fallen tree into logs

ink drawing of an axe in a log

Day fourteen: He chopped the fallen tree into logs, then split them into pieces suitable for the stove. He’d need enough to last the long winter.

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There’s more art: @edaggarart & elizabethdaggar.com

 

Farewell September, hello Inktober!

Looking up at stars through trees

Every year it seems I forget about Inktober until about a week too late. But this year I remembered and I’m excited to do 29 more drawings! I like the restriction of it. Certainly it’s not forbidden to add color, but I’m taking it as a black and white challenge. Above is my drawing from Day one, and below is Day two. They’ll also be on my instagram (@edaggarart).

More art also at:elizabethdaggar.com.

Leaving woods on a winter night

There was a small woods across the street from the farm. Before the people bought the land and built the large farmhouse and attendant stables and fenced-in pastures, it had been a winter wheat field. If you walked across or around to the back of that field, you’d come upon a picturesque little meadow, hemmed in by trees across which was hidden a lovely woods with a little ribbon of stream running through. It was pretty at all times of year, but in Winter it truly felt like a magical realm, far away from the world.

 

Continue reading “Farewell September, hello Inktober!”

SLOW: children drinking

watercolor sketch of people
Nah, the sign says children playing, but it’s in the backyard of a bar, so kind of the same thing. I was doing two sides of the yard at once to be inconspicuous, and wound up with a giant guy floating behind the people with popcorn. Rather an odd image.