Watery interpretations of celestial superstitions

Watercolor illustration of Aquarius at the UNLast month I created more images using my watercolor paired with digital vectors technique, this time for some editorial illustrations. They were for an article suggesting things to do while in NYC based upon visitors’ astrological signs, which was published earlier this month.

These took a departure from my food illustrations, in that these form complete scenes. It was more challenging, to be sure, and I learned a lot in the process. It was also great fun, honestly, and such a pleasure to be able to create things like this at work. My watercolor half-pans have basically set up permanent camp at the office.

Be sure to check out the full article on nycgo.com— it’s cheeky and fun!
Watercolor illustration of Virgo at the TKTS booth in Times SquareWatercolor illustration of Leo at the NY Public Library
Watercolor illustration of Taurus at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden

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Candles emitting a cadmium glow

watercolor sketch of some candlesThese candles, clad in two layers of glass, reflect and shimmer beautifully in the dim interior and caught my eye. I didn’t spend as much time truly observing them as I may have; rather did a sort of lazy caricature or symbolized portrait of them.watercolor sketch of some candles, in normal colorMy scanner has a really tough time with these new cadmium paints in my kit, so I worked in Photoshop to try to return the colors to how they look on the page, but still not really accurate.
watercolor sketch of some candles, in filtered monochrome colorDecided fuck it and went fully another way with a Nik filter, which produced the monochrome image. I learned from that. While it may be less true to the many colors in the glass, it feels truer. And looks more interesting.

Some gentle little watercolor illustrations

watercolor of a prawn

Here are some illustrations I’m working on for a project. The process involves first doing a pencil drawing of the shape, which I then scan and trace in Adobe Illustrator so I have a clean-lined vector shape. Then I print it out as just a black outline, and tape to the back of a piece of watercolor paper.

Next, I place the sandwiched sheets of paper on a lightbox, and paint with watercolor. Finally, I scan the painted pieces and use the vector shape as a clipping mask to regain the crisp edges of the original drawing.

It sounds like a long process, but it’s a wonderful way to combine the organic flow of the watercolor with the sharp lines of a vector illustration.

If I have time soon, I’ll put some process pics up here, as that probably sounds like a foreign language to anyone not familiar with the tools involved.
watercolor of parsley
watercolor of a fishwatercolor of a cuke slice and some watercress

On messing about with the interplay of color, briefly

abstract geometric watercolor composition

Here are a couple watercolor studies I did last night involving compositions of overlapping shapes. I haven’t touched my half-pans in months, and it was nice to get out the brushes again.

These are related -somewhat- to elements of a small design system I’m in the midst of at work for an upcoming event. In particular the top one, where the colors are doing their natural combinations when overlapped.

abstract geometric watercolor composition , another

This second composition was rather a departure or experiment that, while some interesting things happened, rather collapsed the visualization of the colors’ transparency. By removing the natural order of color interplay, the whole thing flattened out altogether to the eye. There’s no reason or logic to it.

Continue reading “On messing about with the interplay of color, briefly”

The waning light turned gold and reflected in the windows

Painting of Amsterdam rooftops by E Daggar

Here is a painting from a small series I did back in 2007. (It’s hard to believe that was a decade ago!) This is Amsterdam II, and it has been sold! Its new home will be in California, and I’m very excited for its new adventure.

Though I love having my art in my own home, it’s really meant to go out into the world and be enjoyed by others, so I’m super happy that someone loved it enough to buy it. And in this case, he gets the bonus of an original hand-crafted Mad Framer floating frame in the deal.

Dishing on design!

"Silhouettes I Hate" sketch on fashion

This is a fun little sketch I started while watching Project Runway. It is one of few ‘reality tv’ shows I enjoy, mainly because the contestants (however manipulated, scripted, or edited out of context for drama) do actually design and create the clothing on the show. I love watching the process, and seeing the results.

Here is a repeat of half of a spread I posted several days ago, paired with a new painting that I did on the back of the same page. The markers had bled through, leaving a ghost on the obverse, and once I had the half-pans out, I couldn’t resist painting a new face over it.

 

Art and other follies: a compilation

Elizabeth Daggar Art from Elizabeth Daggar on Vimeo.

In case you didn’t know, I have a website that hosts my fine art work: paintings, drawings, multiples, and sketches. Go to elizabethdaggar.com to check it out!

PS— this video looks better on instagram (no sidebars)

 

Hair Lines: test runs in watercolor


Some time back, I began a series of drawings with a project in mind: a coloring book, all about studies of hair. Well, after I’d got three of them inked, I had a few printed on card stock, for test runs.


I’ve been looking forward to doing an hombre on the woman’s hair, and I really enjoyed painting these. However I have to admit these are not ideal subjects for a coloring book, as I’ve suspected for weeks now. Not so great for colored pencil work, nor for people who don’t consider themselves artists. maybe. It’s one of those ‘back to the drawing board’ moments. Whether I’ll still work on some sort of coloring book, or work on something altogether new remains to be seen.

Studies for paintings: art archive

two sketched portraitsHere are some sketchbook studies from some years ago. Two of these (above right and farther below) turned into oil paintings (working in thin glazes) on wood panels, frames painted to match.

oil painting of an angel

two portrait studies
These two are clearly showing the influence of one Egon Shiele.

In the case of the studies (second set in particular), I believe the finished pieces lost something in the translations; the faces are more expressive in the studies, the light and shadows more dramatic and compelling.

oil painting portrait