Sunset Swing beer can labels

Here’s a first for me: Beer can label design for the Sunset Swing annual gala, held by one of my clients (Southwest Brooklyn Industrial Development Corp.). Five Boroughs Brewing Co. created a brew just for the upcoming event, and this is the proof for the finished labels. So fun!

Below are some photos of the can and the ad journal from the event last evening. They were printed with printed a metallic gold for the lettering and windows, which looks fantastic.

The flapper!


Here is a glimpse at number three in the ongoing series of illustrations for a book. Finger waves on a flapper.

Luck is a residual of preparation: visiting artist talk


Monica Forsythe wrote an an article on Medium regarding my visiting artist talk for UMBC at the Spark Gallery during the Light City Festival in Baltimore. I’m honored and gratified to have made such an impression. It was a curious and enlightening endeavor. The preparation for the talk took me backwards through time, and reminded me where I came from. In college I was, oddly, a technophobe about computers— I was all about physical media.

In recent years, conversely, I’ve found the opposite to be true. The blank page or canvas can hold a terror it never did when I was younger; a result of reliance upon ‘save as’ and ‘undo.’ Yet I’ve never given up on the analog. I found ways to incorporate the flexibility of digital into my analog works. Scan, scan, scan; add, edit, layer.

The preparation for this talk had me go through years of process; recalling how I got from one place to the next. It was a revelation of remembrance; a kind of rejuvenation. It also reinforced how quickly things tend to change (the thesis for my whole talk)— how that’s more true than ever.

Thank you, Monica! I’ll be reading more Between the Frames in future, and keeping an eye out for your work.

Below: some selects from the presentation, for fun.
Title slide for ELizabeth Daggar visiting artist talk at Light City for UMBC

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Remember that project I mentioned? Inking fine lines

ink drawing portrait of a man
Here are some sneak peaks of the first two illustrations for the book I’m working on. These top to are photos showing much of the finished illustrations, and below are details of the scanned images.

ink drawing of a woman with long hair

I need to gain momentum; I’d like to complete 3-4 illustrations per week to keep this moving. Gotta stay motivated!
section of an ink drawing portraitsection of an ink drawing portrait
And here is a slice of the pencil for number two.

Do you have a new project for Spring?


I’ve begun a new project that I’ll be posting about here periodically (if not frequently). I’ll not reveal the details just yet, only a slice of the first drawing. I spent last weekend researching in preparation after an idea from last year resurfaced.

I love it when an idea that’s collected some dust raises its head again, unbidden. It usually means it’s worth pursuing. But until it picks up more momentum, that’s all I’m going to say. It’s still just a seedling at the moment— you understand. Look out for this also @edaggarart

What new project(s) do you have unfurling as the days get finer?

Stained glass abandoned in favor of a vintage flavor

I decided against the stained glass approach in the end. I Chose instead, to focus on repeated patterns— a race horse silhouette, with the silks in the spotlight, and a larger repeating pattern behind them.

After much experimentation with various backdrops and shifts in color for the silhouettes, I landed on a maximum vintage palette and pattern, which incidentally called for my current favorite typeface. 🙂

Below: a couple of the numerous rejected schemes

Stained glass, and stumbling upon a thief

I’ve been working on some ideas for the 2017 Derby Party poster for Commonwealth Bar here in Brooklyn; one idea being a faux stained glass approach. Above is the spare beginning of a design in progress. Below is the same design, incorporating a stock image as a placeholder to decide whether I wanted to pursue the idea before continuing work on it.
As I was perusing Google image for visual inspiration, I spotted a thief, caught in the act! Below is a poster (right) for an event in Chicago, whose promoter or venue blatantly stole my 2003 Derby poster for Ray (left), and then obliterated its elegance with godawful type treatments for a Derby Party.

Step one: Steal design. Step two: Ruin it!

I’ve emailed said promoter re: the violation of copyright, and requested it be taken down. I also offered the possibility of licensing the image or commissioning me for an original (neither of which I expect him or her to take me up on, but worth a try).

This takes the notion of a ‘lazy steal’ to a quite literal level as compared to the imitation from 2015. People: Google image search is not a one-stop-shop for royalty-free images.

Side note: Who has a Derby Party that ends before the race? Post time this year is at 6:46pm ; this party ends at 6:00.

UPDATE: The promoter replied to my email stating that the venue was responsible for the flier, and that they are making a new one.