Inktober has returned!

Well I hadn’t planned on participating in Inktober this year, but then on the second, I decided I would after all, but with no pressure this year. No attempt at a narrative which I haven’t time to work out properly.

The pressure to craft un-flawed images is precisely what keeps me from drawing half the time, and also keeps me from experimentation and play, so I’m abolishing pressure! There’s plenty of that at work with deadlines as it is. Here are my first five drawings for this year.

I see from my last post that the entire month of September went by without a peep from me here on ol’ bloggy. That makes me sad, and I miss writing.

The only thing I miss, really, about being a sole proprietor is the bags of time I used to have. Time to allow things to percolate in my mind; to wander for hours in the late afternoon, on foot or on my bicycle. To put hours of time into this and other non-essential but satisfying pursuits, like my calendar projects.

There can be a paucity of time or energy (often both) that goes along with a full-time job into which one is invested and interested. Choosing how and where to spend those valued assets can be difficult.

VOGUE

Sketch of some fashion type ladies, Vogue-style

Strike a Pose

I bought a new refillable brush pen last night; it takes cartridges of permanent ink like a fountain pen. I did this drawing to take it for a test drive, and I kinda love how it turned out, after some pushing and pulling.

I paired it with a white paint pen and a dash of red ball point, for drama. In the background I was catching up on some episodes of Pose, so fashion, attitude, gender fluidity were influencers— not to mention Madonna’s take on that buzzword a la mode.

Netflix and draw: Blue Planet odyssey

pencil drawings of undersea creatures

When I watch something like Blue Planet II, practically every frame of the incredible footage begs to be drawn or painted, so I spent several hours last night sketching some of the beasties— and consequently missing many of the others. Next time I can draw some of the ones I missed this time around.

pencil drawings of more aquatic creatures, including walruses

Last week I did the same thing while watching (re-watching) Civilizations. Some sketched interpretations of ancient art came from that session.

Sketches inspired by the ancient art in Civilizations.

Little cabins in the mountains

black and white watercolor sketch of some simple mountain cabins and pine trees

I painted this little sketch from Friday night this afternoon, and finally made use of the goose-neck phone holder to record a time-lapse of it.

Crossing into a new year armed with a pen

Ink sketch of people at the bar

New Year’s Eve: the borderlands of the year; symbol of hope, renewal, revelry. To some, the biggest party of the year. To others, just a day like all the others. I reckon my take on it falls somewhere in between. It’s nice to mark it, to be in the company of others, but not the sort of event I buy new clothes for, (Although, to be honest, I rarely buy new clothes for anything in particular.)

Left: sketch of a woman on tv interviewing revelers at Times Square. Right: two men dancing at the bar

So it was I found myself at my local around 10pm. I braved the dismal rain for two whole blocks to meet up with TL after her shift at the restaurant. She went home before the changing of the guard, but I stayed.

I’d spent the day working on updating my art website, and along the way I realized I’ve not done any drawings in two years with my trusted old ball-point with the ink that smears so wonderfully—so I armed myself thusly before heading out, hoping to fill the last few pages of my sketchbook at the close of the year.

Ink sketch of people at the far end of the bar

The simplicity of working with a single pen is good for bar drawings. You must work fast, as people may walk away or re-orient at any moment, The setting is dim, so details are hard to pin down anyway. These are aspects of bar drawing that I really enjoy. No time for thinking— just keep grabbing what information you can.

The type of decision-making apparent in these sketches differs from my more thoughtfully-approached drawings. I learn so much from doing them, despite that they never look finished or beautiful.

And now, it’s time to begin a new Moleskine, the first of 2019. Happy New Year, and thanks for reading!

It’s Our Pleasure to Serve you

pencil caricature of classic NYC greek coffee cup

Here is a sketch from last night that I initially posted on instagram with the title “It’s Our Pleasure to Serve You, off the clock”. New Yorkers may recognize this personification of the blue and white Greek-styled coffee cup;  the default paper cup used in thousands of corner delis for years.
sketches of Margot Tenenbaum
And here are some quickie sketches of Margot Tenenbaum. They’re not really working yet, but I did these without reference from memory, so that’s not surprising. More work to be done to capture the right look.

sketch of a woman holding a photo boxFinally, here is a sketch of a woman holding an old box of long-forgotten photographs. This is a possible thread for this year’s INKTOBER.

You may recall from my series last year that there was the Stevedore and the mysterious woman walking in the rain. Well, those two, in their autumnal-wintry world, may be returning… Stay tuned here or follow me @edaggarart on IG to see 31 days of drawings, beginning tomorrow!

The language of flowers in statecraft

ink sketches of roses

The state flower of New York is the rose, which also happens to be our national flower. It signifies love and beauty, as well as war and politics.

I’m researching and sketching them for a project in which they may play a large role— a wallpaper design to be precise. The tricky thing about roses, from a design point of view, is their tendency to look rather like blobs of petals rather than having a distinct silhouette.

Continue reading “The language of flowers in statecraft”

india ink blotsI remember when I was younger there was a sort of general consensus around the idea that New Yorkers* were among the most self-obsessed, narcissistic assholes on the planet, especially artist and academic types†. And, I don’t know, maybe that was true.

Things have changed though. Through the power of technology (smart phones, social media, &c) now nearly everyone is a self-obsessed narcissistic asshole— it‘s a goddamned epidemic!

Have you ever run into someone, and you’re like ‘Hey what’s new?’ and they start telling you about some ongoing saga in the middle, because they assume you‘re up-to-date via their posts on Facebook or whatever?

Now that is some self-absorbed narcissistic shit! And it‘s pretty common! Here‘s some homework you can do, in case you‘re feeling a little guilty.

Repetition in ink of "I'm self-absorbed as fuck"

*LA must have been a close second.

†My schoolmates and I (yes, art school) found this notion hilarious and kinda‘ leaned into it for awhile; it seemed a very Fluxus thing to do.

Sunday morning, looking through old sketchbooks

pen and ink "Hello" script

It’s a fine Sunday, breezy and overcast; not bad qualities for a lazy morning at a window-side desk.

A long time ago I used to use crow quill dip pens for drawing and lettering. Though it can be a chore keeping those nibs clean enough to flow nicely, their character cannot be matched by the modern ink-filled pens that strive to emulate the look. It is, in part, the tension between the sharp metal and the paper that makes it unmistakable.

diminutive sketch of a woman with red raincoat and red umbrella

This little monochrome sketch has aways touched me. It somehow reminds me of Tove Jansson’s Fillyjonk character. I’ve been posting forgotten things from old sketchbooks on IG; follow me @edaggarart to see more.