I’ve long been a collector of forks

photo of almost 200 forks, most of my collection

Above is a photograph of most of my fork collection, arrayed by size and type. I remembered, as I reexamined them for the first time in years, that I downsized and edited the collection once before; there used to be many more sets of little cocktail novelty forks and fondue forks, &c.

A reasoned edit was the goal yesterday as well, and I wanted to have a photo of as many as possible— see them all in one place and count them. (185 shown I think)

photo of the forks I've decided to keep, bundles for storage. (not including the strawberry forks, which are in a little box, as they are so delicate)

Here is a photo of the keepers, bundled to go back in the box, with the exception only of the strawberry forks, given me by a friend’s mother (they’re back in their box, as they’re so delicate).

another photo of the forks tied in bundles, from last weekend

Here is a similar photo from last week, when I initially laid them out to assess. This image shows them on a lumpy old sheet, and includes almost all of them, before I removed many of the busted ones and contemporary stainless steel ones.

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4 thoughts on “I’ve long been a collector of forks

  1. They look so impressive laid out in the top photo. They are artworks individually and as a whole. I collect lace handkerchiefs, photobooth photos and traditional kokeshi dolls. The dolls are the only items that are on display, even then, not all of them. Do you display any of the forks? I hate having my treasures tucked away and out of sight. What is your feeling about your collection?

    1. Thanks so much! I agree they are artworks; They remind me of fancy typography or symbols, which was why I began collecting them. I used to have a number of them hanging from tiny nails on a wall, but in recent years, only a few are on display, which I find disheartening too. I’d love to have at least some of them on a wall again.
      My other collections are antique books and Victorian/Edwardian era cabinet card portraits 🙂

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